MENTAL ARITHMETIKK OG TRENING

THE SCIENCE OF BRAIN TRAINING by
Dr Ryuta Kawashima

Results are reported that reading aloud and doing arithmetic can be effective methods of training the brain. Quickly solving simple mathematical problems and reading aloud appear to be highly effective ways of training the brain. The experimental group was given a memory test using subjects ranging from elementary school pupils to adults. Result of these tests showed that the memory of a person was 2-3 times better following the simple mathematics and reading read aloud two to five days a week.

The images on the right are representations of blood flow within the brain as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The red and yellow areas show the parts of the brain that are engaged in activity, with yellow indicating more activity than red.


Dr. Ryuta Kawashima is famous for his research around Brain activities and aging, publications, brain training games on Nintendo

The images on the right are representations of blood flow within the brain as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The red and yellow areas show the parts of the brain that are engaged in activity, with yellow indicating more activity than red.

When thinking the left side of the brain is working slightly, but the right side of the brain is totally inactive.

Even though this requires a lot of effort, the brain does not show very much activity.

When reading aloud, the faster the material is read, the more activity can be seen.

When trying to solve simple problems quickly, many areas in both the left and right sides of the brain are showing significant activity


MENTAL ABACUS RESEARCH PROGRAMME by
Dr David Barner (University of California, San Diego)
and Michael Frank (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Result reported that children with mental abacus training showed advantages on addition and estimation tasks. Abacus users were significantly more accurate than untrained participants at solving addition problems with multiple addends with a ten second time limit.  Abacus users also showed a different pattern of responses, suggesting that they are using different mental resources to think about number. Abacus users were presented with images and asked to estimate the number of dots in the display. The more the display resembled and abacus, the more accurate children were.